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MDPAC: Michigan Voting Information

How do you find your polling location?

There are two ways to determine your polling location. First, you can look at your voter identification card. Your polling location is listed in a red box on your voter identification card. Second, you can look online on the Michigan Secretary of State website. On the website you can search for your polling location by name or driver's license number.

Link: https://webapps.sos.state.mi.us/MVIC/votersearch.aspx

Where can you find a sample ballot?

You can look online on the Michigan Secretary of State website. On the website you can search for your sample ballot by name or driver's license number.

Link: https://webapps.sos.state.mi.us/MVIC/votersearch.aspx

What type of identification must be provided at the polling location?

Every Michigan voter must show picture identification or sign an affidavit attesting that he or she is not in possession of picture identification. Voters can satisfy the picture identification requirement by showing a Michigan driver's license or a Michigan personal identification card. Voters who do not possess either document may show any of the following forms of picture identification:

  • Current driver's license or personal identification card issued by another state.
  • Current federal or state government-issued photo identification.
  • Current U.S. passport.
  • Current student identification with photo - from a high school or an accredited institution of higher education.
  • Current military identification card with photo.
  • Current tribal identification card with photo.

The election inspector will match the name appearing on your form of picture identification to the name entered by you on your Application to Vote. Therefore, ensure that the name you enter on your Application to Vote matches the name on your form of picture identification. The Application to Vote is a document you fill out at the polling location before you vote.

Link (Application to Vote): http://www.michigan.gov/documents/sos/Application_to_Vote_209347_7.pdf?20130614121802

If you cannot satisfy the picture identification requirement, then you can sign an affidavit attesting that you are not in possession of picture identification. The affidavit can be used by two types of voters:

  1. Voters who do not have acceptable picture identification.
  2. Voters who have acceptable picture identification but do not bring it to the polls.

Link (Affidavit of Voter Not in Possession of Picture Identification): http://www.michigan.gov/documents/sos/Affidavit_of_Voter_in_Posession_209344_7.pdf?20130614121635

There are special rules that apply to voters subject to the federal identification requirement. The federal identification requirement applies to any voter who (1) registered to vote by mail and (2) has never voted in Michigan. To meet the federal identification requirement you must show a copy of any current and valid photo identification or a copy of a paycheck, government check, utility bill, bank statement or a government document which lists your name and address. Further, once you have satisfied the federal identification requirement, you must also satisfy the Michigan identification requirement (see above).

See the following link for a list of documents that satisfy the federal identification requirement: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/Fed_ID_Req_105890_7.pdf

Can individuals campaign at polling locations?

Yes. Individuals are permitted to campaign at polling locations. However, there are restrictions in place to protect you from intimidation and coercion. No person is permitted to solicit voters or engage in any type of campaigning within 100 feet of any doorway used by voters to enter the building in which a polling place is located. In addition, no person is permitted to post, display, or distribute any material that directly or indirectly makes reference to an election, a candidate, or a ballot question in the polling place, in any hallway used by voters to enter or exit the polling place, or within 100 feet of any doorway used by voters to enter the building in which the polling place is located.

The following activities are expressly prohibited within the 100 foot zone:

  • Displaying "pro and con" information on the proposals appearing on the ballot.
  • Approaching voters to encourage them to vote for or against a candidate or ballot question.
  • Distributing any type of campaign literature or write-in stickers.
  • Displaying signs, posters or bumper stickers.
  • Attempting to collect petition signatures.
  • Requesting donations, selling tickets or engaging in similar activities.

A voter may park a car or other vehicle bearing campaign signs or bumper stickers within 100 feet of a doorway used by voters to enter the building in which the polling place is located during the time he or she is voting. Otherwise, such a vehicle must be parked at least 100 feet from any doorway used by voters to enter the building in which the polling place is located.

You will not be permitted to wear campaign buttons or clothing bearing the name of a candidate. Election inspectors must request that voters entering the polls remove campaign buttons or cover up clothing which bears any reference to a political party or interest group, campaign slogans, or a candidate name. In addition, voters must be told to conceal campaign literature or other campaign materials brought into the polls. While there is nothing to prohibit a voter from referring to campaign literature when voting, such materials may not be left behind in the voting station.

Can you take photographs or videos at the polling location?

No. The use of video cameras, still cameras, and recording devices by voters is prohibited in the polls during the hours the polls are open for voting. This includes use of the camera built into your cell phone or other electronic devices. Additionally, the use of cell phones by voters who have entered a voting station to vote is strictly prohibited.

Additional Notes:

 

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